Joni Blue by Liz Davinci

Liz Davinci, Music, Punk Noir Magazine, Torch Songs

JoniBlue_AlbumArt

For the past 6 months an album has been coming together and it has developed from a handful of demos into a full-fledged concept album, promising innovative trailers and experimental songs.

The album is divided into five “stages” as the protagonist, Victoria, moves through different experiences.

The stages are, in order, “Contentment”, “Love”, “Love disappears”, “Revolution” and “Imprisonment”.

Talented crime fiction, noir and freelance writers such as Paul D. Brazill, Jim Shaffer, Mark McConville, Kate Laity and Underhatchet have prepared texts in line with these stages.

The album is planned to be a “happening” for the next 6 months as album trailers unfold and a few singles are released.

“Joni Blue“, releasing July 24, 2020, is the first glimpse of the album and belongs to the stage “Contentment”.

I hope you enjoy the first taste of what is to come.

Joni Blue

Liz Davinci
 
 
 
 

Talking to Strangers by K. A. Laity

Fiction, K A Laity, Music, Punk Noir Magazine

PhotoFunia-1593254997Talking to Strangers

K. A. Laity

 

I do talk to strangers. You don’t mind, do you? I know some people do. They move away from me on the bench, even if it’s raining and they get all wet. Sometimes I can understand. You want a bit of quiet, you want to think your thoughts. I feel that way sometimes, too. The thoughts they have a way of getting out or getting in, up in your brain like, I guess. They want to have a wander, they want to let you see the shape of them and hear their voices and sometimes that’s not bad at all.

Do you want a bite of my sandwich? It’s fresh. I just got it out back of the shop there. No one else but me has eaten it. No? Well, if you change your mind, don’t be shy.

Thoughts was it? I was thinking. We are all thinking. All the time. My husband used to say that’s why he drank. Joking like, you know, only joking—or was he? Sometimes I wasn’t sure. He had that deadpan wit, that quiet sort of way, only joking he would say and sometimes I figured, as you do, sometimes I figured he was only saying so, you know what I’m going to say, only saying so when he had been caught out and it wasn’t a joke at all just a thing he wanted to say and then walk back from as if he had never said it or meant it or not.

He was always like that. God rest his soul.

No, no: not dead. He’s alive last I knew. I think I saw him in town about a year ago, hurrying along to the betting shop. Getting his little flutter in. Like the drinking it was never so much, just a bit to distract him. Mostly from me. I think he regretted things, as you do, as we all do sometimes. The baby, I regretted the baby. We regretted the baby, I mean. A mistake, after all. A mistake when the house is not full of love. Babies need love. Babies need care. Constant care. You have to be there all the time. You have to be attentive. He wasn’t going to be the one. It had to be me.

I can share my chocolate bar. Shall I break off a piece? No? On a diet. Young thing like you shouldn’t worry about slimming. You never regret the chocolate. That’s one thing I can say for sure. Never regret the cakes or the biscuits. No. Children though, you regret them.

I haven’t thought of them in years. Children I mean. We can live our whole lives without them, you know. It’s not just modern women. In my time, too. Lots of women, lots, decided they could do without. That was the age of the pill. You take it for granted now. But in my day—

Oh listen to me! Talking like my gran, like I said I would never do. ‘In my day’ well, we all know things were different in the past though not always as much as we guess. Same as in my gran’s day because the priests you know, the priests said it was sinful so we had the babies we didn’t want and had to live with it make the best of it. That’s the way it was.

And it wasn’t what I meant to do, none of it. Didn’t really want a baby, not once I found out that I got tired of him. You can’t imagine how dull men are when they have you, when they don’t care to please you anymore. Just want a mum to clean up after them, feed them, bring them tea.

And all the time you have to be fussing with another baby, too, one that cries and screams and has the most foul smelling poo you ever could imagine in your life. No, wait until you find out for yourself. So foul.

And just a moment’s distraction. Well, a few minutes. I was only away a moment. The bath is—well, we should have had little baby one but himself didn’t want to buy it. Only a minute or so. The water was cold, I told them, because I was always afraid of scalding that tender skin. Really. Sad, it was, but he looked pretty as a doll once he was quiet.

Don’t you want a bite?

Spellbound: The Story of John McGeoch

Art, John McGeoch, Manchester, Music, post punk, punk, Punk Noir Magazine

john mcgeoch

From Wikipedia:

John Alexander McGeoch (25 August 1955 – 4 March 2004) was a Scottish rock music guitarist who played with several bands of the post-punk era, including MagazineSiouxsie and the BansheesVisage, and Public Image Ltd.

He has been described as one of the most influential guitarists of his generation. In 1996 he was listed by Mojo in their “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” for his work on the Siouxsie and the Banshees song “Spellbound“. Signature characteristics of his playing style included an inventive arpeggiosstring harmonics, the uses of flanger and an occasional disregard for conventional scales.

Musician and producer Steve Albini praised McGeoch for his guitar playing with Magazine and Siouxsie and the Banshees, qualifying as “great choral swells, great scratches and buzzes, great dissonant noise and great squealy death noise What a guy” and further commenting: “anybody can make notes. There’s no trick. What is a trick and a good one is to make a guitar do things that don’t sound like a guitar at all. The point here is stretching the boundaries”.

Big Gold Dream

Grant McPhee, Indie, Music, Orange Juice, Paul Research, post punk, punk, Punk Noir Magazine, Subway Sect, Vic Godard

big gold dreamFrom Wikipedia:

‘Big Gold Dream is a 2015 film documenting the story of Scotland’s post-punk scene, focusing on record labels Fast Product and Postcard Records. Directed by filmmaker Grant McPhee, the film’s name is taken from the 1981 Fire Engines single of the same name, the final release on the Pop Aural label. The film won the 2015 Edinburgh International Film Festival Audience Award.

 

 

Johnny Britton

Indie, Johnny Britton., Music, Orange Juice, post punk, Punk Noir Magazine, Subway Sect, The Clash
johnny britton
Johnny Britton’s career has beaten a strident path as an innovator through the cutting-edge first wave of punk, the sophistication of post punk, as a solo artiste protégé, a catalyst for new acts, as an in-demand singer/musician in the prominent musical groups Subway Sect and Orange Juice and the DJ of Soho’s Club Left and the WOMAD festivals
Singer/guitarist with Subway Sect, Orange Juice and solo artist protégé of Clash/Specials/Dexys/Subway Sect/Joboxers manager Bernard Rhodes.
This album is a ‘best of’ encompassing the wide range of musical styles in the world of Johnny Britton, from his singles ‘The One That Got Away’ and ‘Perpetual Emotion’, to rare acoustic Latin, Cool Bop and Swing, Punk and Classic Rock. Many of these tracks are now heard for the very first time.

credits

released November 23, 2018

MUSICIANS
Johnny Britton: vocals, guitars
Chris Bostock: spanish guitar, bass
Sean McLusky: drums, percussion
Rob Marche: electric guitar
DC Collard: keyboards, bass, trumpet
Alfonso: Bass
Charlie Llewellin: drums

Summer Wine by K. A. Laity

Flash Fiction, K A Laity, Music, Nancy Sinatra, Punk Noir Magazine

nancyHow does that grab you, darlin’? I told you it was good, didn’t I? You can taste it all in there. Strawberries, cherries, and some special herbs. I make it myself. From my mama’s recipe. Kiss of an angel, she’d say as she handed it to my poppa. Kiss of an angel in the first blush of spring. 

See, that’s the colour. Blush. I know, most men are afraid to drink something pink. Don’t think of it as pink. It’s a blush. Like that first glow when you see a man is looking at you in that way. You know what I mean, I see you do. 

Go on, get comfortable. Take off those heavy boots. Have another glass. Sure is hot out! That’s why I always keep the wine nice and cool. It’s sweet, but when it’s kept cold that sweetness doesn’t overwhelm you. With a little cheese it’s just a perfect match. Maybe I’ll get some cheese out in a little while. Here, let me pour you some more. 

This is last year’s wine. It has to sit over the winter to really bloom. I know it’s called aging. When it’s in a cask that seems right, but I let this sit in a big glass bottle. They call it a demijohn. I think that’s kind of cute. There’s a few more steps to it but that’s not very interesting.

The fruit comes from the trees out there and the berry garden. When I was a girl we had a neat orchard and the brambles were well maintained, but it was more difficult to keep up with it all once poppa died. Would you believe there are black currants in there? Too many and it gets a little too red, gaudy really. But I like the flavour they give.

With all the rain see how lush everything has got? Last year’s pickings were a little slimmer. My late husband said we needed better fertilizing but he couldn’t be bothered to do anything about it, alas. Everything’s much better this year. The right fertilizer definitely helps.

No, don’t get up. What do you need? Oh. How about some more wine? No? Just a little? Funny how sleepy it can make you, right? More than regular wine. People say homemade wine gives you a bad head in the morning, but that’s down to a sloppy process. My process is very precise. My herbal flourish is a part of that. That’s what makes my wine different.

See—no, don’t nod off just yet!—see, I need to tell you about my herbs. You have to know the right amounts of course, but you also have to worry about the taste. You can’t have something so bitter a man won’t take more than one swig without complaining. It took me a few years to perfect it. My late husband was a tough customer. He’d just spit it right out if he didn’t like it. No manners. No consideration for my hard work. Not much to recommend him at all.

Anyway, I perfected the taste. He never even guessed how fast it could work. All I had to do was get him to take a second glass. I knew it had enough it to do him in. He loved it! Even drank a third glass. I won’t say he was easy to kill. It took years to get to that recipe.

There now. Just let your head rest right there. You won’t feel a thing. Just the kiss of an angel.

Peter Hall – There’s Something Wrong With Everyone

Hartlepool, Indie, Music, Peter Hall, Punk Noir Magazine, The Beautiful Music

THE BEAUTIFUL MUSIC

tbm

peter hall

Peter Hall may not be a familiar name to most of you but hopefully that will soon change, as he is an incredibly talented musician, that is just waiting to be discovered. Some may recognize the name as the person  behind the wonderful band Play People who first recorded two EP’s on the brilliant This Almighty Pop! label run by a person with impeccable taste, Stephen Maughan (of Bulldozer Crash, Kosmonaut and The Memory Fades) and a 7” single on another highly regarded label Cloudberry Records (run by Roque Ruiz, who is one of the most knowledgeable people in the indie pop world). So already with a pedigree like that, you know it is going to be excellent and we are immensely proud to have it as a Beautiful Music release.

This EP combines beautiful melodies with intelligent lyrics, and will bring to mind bands like Aztec Camera, The Lilac Time, Elliot Smith, Delta, Captain Soul, January, Paul Weller, and Nick Heyward’s recent release “Woodland Echoes” and probably several other Scottish Pop bands and maybe even with a hint of mod thrown in as an influence.

Janglepophub mentions a few more, if you are looking for possible similarities: “the two stripped back tracks of Hold Me and She Fell From The Sky, visit Tame Impala / De Marco style semi chill jangle and piano-less Nick Batterham guitar strums respectively, whilst maintaining definitive originality by adding the sort of smooth, rounded production, that just about slides into sophisti-pop territory.” “However, it is when his music ventures into mid-tempo and increases the ‘surroundsound’, that the EP really reaches it’s heights. Blood Flow and Everything is Fading Fast (both below) are able to take their place alongside modern guitar pop luminaries like Dropkick, The Boy With Perpetual Nervousness … as volumes of melodic intent bubble to the surface with a lack of intensity that borders on ‘summer perfect’.”

And to quote When You Motor Away: “We are not particularly familiar with UK artist Peter Hall, but the four tracks on “There’s Something Wrong With Everyone” have made fans of us. This is intimate, carefully crafted and richly melodic indie pop that has lifted our spirits today. We suggest it may well do the same for you. There may be something wrong with everyone, but there is nothing wrong about this EP.”

Give Peter Hall a listen, and you will be richly rewarded. As a bonus, we even threw in an extra hidden track as a surprise, but you will need to get a copy of the EP to discover that :).

“Peter Hall – There’s Something Wrong With Everyone is available as a CD (Beauty 048) directly from The Beautiful Music’s secure, PayPal-enabled ordering portal at www.thebeautifulmusic.comand a few select online distributers. Digital release also available on Peter Hall’s Bandcamp page.

Peter Hall Bandcamp: https://peterhallmusic.bandcamp.com/
Peter Hall Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/peterhallmusic/