John Wisniewski interviews Paul Heatley

All Due Respect, Close To The Bone, Down and Out Books., Interviews, John Wisniewski, Paul Heatley, Punk Noir Magazine, Writing

paul heatley

When did you begin writing, Paul?

I’ve been writing stories since I was very young – any scrap of paper I could find I’d scribble a story on, usually about existing characters In was aware of, like the X-Men or whatever other cartoon I’d been watching. In high school I wrote a lot of horror, then after that I tried to write what I guess you would describe as ‘literature’. Nothing really seemed to click until I tried my hand at crime fiction, about eight or nine years ago, and I’ve been getting steadily published since then, starting with my short story ‘Red Eyed Richard’ in issue three of Thuglit.

Any favourite crime authors?

My top three are Jim Thompson, Chester Himes, and James Ellroy, probably on the basis that these are the three crime writers I read first. I’ve imitated the style of Jim Thompson most of all, I think, and Chester Himes‘ influence is most apparent in my Eye For An Eye books. I haven’t tried to ape Ellroy yet, but I’ve got plans… Others include Richard Stark, James M Cain, Alan Parks, Matt Wesolowski, Attica Locke, Joe Lansdale, Marietta Miles, Nikki Dolson, Tom Leins, Shawn Cosby, Hector Acosta, Will Viharo, Daniel Vlasaty, Rob Pierce, Beau Johnson, and Gabino Iglesias, among many others.

What is the scene like in the U.K. with crime/noir writing?

I think it’s healthy. There are people like Tom Leins, Aidan Thorn, Paul D Brazill, and Tess Makovesky, to name a few, who are all flying the flag and making a name for themselves. I’m not sure whereabouts I fit in it, personally. Sure I’m British and I’ve set some stuff here in the north east where I live, but I made the decision to set a lot of my stuff in America. When I come to write a story I always think about first which setting will suit it best, and the US tends to win out, and that’s based on my interests and influences. I read and watch (television and movies) mostly American, and so I think that’s the voice that flows strongest through my writing. The two I have coming out this June, however, are both England-set. Cutthroat takes place in Newcastle, in the 70s, with a little bit of Northumberland and Scotland in it too, and Just Like Jesus is set in Northumberland, predominantly in Amble, the town I grew up in. One thing I always enjoy writing, and switching up between the two settings, is dialogue. It’s fun to write the snappy, one-liner style of Americans, and it’s just as fun to write the colloquialisms of Geordies in the north east of England.

What makes a good crime/suspense story?

For me, I like them to be dark. I’m not averse to some humour – Elmore Leonard and Carl Hiaasen spring to mind – but I like my crime to be of the noir variety and to be exactly as described: pitch black. That’s one of the reasons most of the authors I listed above work primarily in the indies, as that’s where the darkest, most brutal stuff is. Of course, I also want them to have some great characters and some real stakes that they’re working towards. This is what I try to inject into my own writing, and what I’m looking for in other people’s.

Are there any crime/noir film’s that you like?

Drive instantly springs to mind. Blue Velvet, Scorsese gangster movies, Killing Them Softly, Touch Of Evil, Niagara, In A Lonely Place, The Big Sleep, Kiss Me Deadly, Chinatown, Drunken Angel, Stray Dog, Nightcrawler, Get Carter, The Long Good Friday, Hell Or High Water, Stoker, Stormy Monday, Payroll, A Prophet, Killer Joe, City Of God, A Bittersweet Life, Sin Nombre, Heat, Wild At Heart, Fresh, Brick, Dead Presidents, Reservoir Dogs, Blood Simple – there’s a lot, I could probably go on. Also, like a lot of people, I really enjoyed Uncut Gems recently.

Paul, could you tell us about writing “Guillotine”? It is full of twist and turns, and often surprises the reader. How do you handle dialogue and pacing?

Guillotine started life as a short story a few years before I actually decided to take the characters I had and insert them into a novella. I felt like I had too much content for a short story, it needed to be something longer, so I basically fleshed out and added background to the scenes I’d already written, then extended the ending. All the stuff with Lou-Lou, especially the second half of the story, was brand new. The pacing for it came as I wrote it, as if usually the case. I’ll start writing something and get a feel for how fast it’s going to move – whether it’s going to be a little more paced and thoughtful, or if it’s going to be breakneck, like Guillotine is.

Dialogue is one of my favourite parts of writing – it not THE favourite. It keeps the story moving, it reveals the characters, their drives, how they act and react. I’m a big fan of George V Higgins and how he tells the bulk of his stories in dialogue. I started using this approach (though maybe not to the same extreme) when I came to write Fatboy, or rather the second draft of Fatboy. When I read through the first draft I found the dialogue was good, but I disliked the exposition. So I focussed more on my strengths.

Could you tell us about the trilogy “The Motel whore”, “The vampire” and “The Boy”? They feature recurring characters and a dark, gloomy atmosphere is created. How do you create this dark world for the reader?

The Motel Whore series was something I wrote very early on. I think it was an effort to get a lot of dark ideas out of my system, and it grew to include The Vampire and The Boy when I started getting the ideas on how to incorporate them into the world of the original story and utilise pre-existing characters. The three tales are quite possibly some of my darkest stuff, not necessarily in terms of violence, but certainly in the way that these characters suffer and the kind of lives they lead. They all in some way rotate around the town’s motel, and the eponymous prostitute that lives there. The printed collection of these tales also includes two new short stories, The Painter and The Shoot.

Could you tell us about writing your latest “Bad Bastards”? What inspired you to write this one?

I’m always looking to write a concise piece of noir, stuff like what Jim Thompson and James M Cain did, with distraught lovers and jealous men and a hitman, so sometimes I’ll write an opening and create some characters without any real idea of where things are going. I did that with the first few chapters of Bad Bastards. It starts almost as a kind of exercise, just to see what I can come up with and where I can go with it. So I had this opening, and I thought it was pretty strong, but then I had to take a seat back and decide what came next – which is when I created the Bad Bastards Motorcycle Club. The original working title of it was Trailer Park Hitman, obviously based round the character of Harvey and his young girlfriend Cherry, but that was literally just a working title. Once I had the motorcycle club’s name I knew that had to become the title. The motorcycle club themselves are kind of background, save for a few characters, but I have plans to make them more central going forward, so let’s hope that comes to fruition.

What will your next book be about?

I’ve got two books coming out this year, both in June. First is Cutthroat, which will be released by All Due Respect. It’s set in Newcastle in 1978 and the best way I can describe it is Get Carter as written by a Geordie Richard Stark. Rob Pierce has edited it and he seemed to like it.

A week after that comes Just Like Jesus, coming out with Close To The Bone (who released my Eye For An Eye books) and this tells the story of two young drug dealers on the Northumbrian coast. They spend their summer days driving round, selling drugs, and hooking up with girls, but petty jealousies and a dangerous boss threaten to destroy everything in their idyllic existence. The front cover is done and I’ve posted it on all my social media if people want to check it out, and the pre-order will probably be available soon (maybe by the time this interview is published) so keep an eye out for that.

PAUL HEATLEY IS UNDER HOUSE-ARREST HERE.

 

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A CONSUMER: PAUL HEATLEY

Films, Paul Heatley, Portait Of The Artist As A Consumer, Punk Noir Magazine, Televison.

christmas stocking

SONGS

 

Strange Religion – Mark Lanegan

 

Sounds Of Silence – Simon & Garfunkel

 

Better Than You – Swans

 

Shook Ones Part II – Mobb Deep

 

Human Fly – The Cramps

 

The Days Of Swine And Roses – My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult

 

Bring Da Ruckus – Wu Tang Clan

 

Sex Beat – The Gun Club

 

Discipline – Throbbing Gristle

 

Bring Me The Head Of Yukio Mishima – Snivelling Shits

 

Heard It Through The Grapevine – Marvin Gaye

 

Smokestack Lightnin – Howlin Wolf

 

Straight To You – Nick Cave

 

Beware – Death Grips

 

Blue Thunder – Galaxie 500

 

Ain’t No Fun To Me – Al Green

 

Mongoloid – Devo

 

Come On Feel The Illinoise – Sufjan Stevens

 

TELEVISON

 

The Wire

 

Breaking Bad

 

Brooklyn 99

 

The Punisher

 

Lost

 

Twin Peaks

 

The Sopranos

 

Atlanta

 

Carnivale

 

Les Revenants

 

BOOKS

 

The Clown – Heinrich Boll

 

Black Dahlia – James Ellroy

 

A Rage In Harlem – Chester Himes

 

Savage Night – Jim Thompson

 

Go Tell It On The Mountain – James Baldwin

 

Blonde – Joyce Carol Oates

 

IT – Stephen King

 

White Teeth – Zadie Smith

 

The Cartel – Don Winslow

 

Kavalier and Clay – Michael Chabon

 

Last Exit To Brooklyn – Hubert Selby Jr

 

A Scanner Darkly – Philip K Dick

 

The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea – Yukio Mishima

 

Lost Weekend – Charles Jackson

 

Wise Blood – Flannery O’Connor

 

East Of Eden – John Steinbeck

 

FILMS

 

Taxi Driver

 

Rocky

 

Get Carter

 

Apocalypse Now

 

Blue Velvet

 

Zulu

 

Kill List

 

Stormy Monday

 

Heat

 

Boyz In The Hood

 

Mo Better Blues

 

La Haine

 

Some Like It Hot

 

Seven Samurai

 

East Of Eden

 

The Holy Mountain

 

PLACES

 

Newcastle Upon Tyne

 

Edinburgh

 

Gateshead

 

Alnwick

 

Amble

 

Hadston

paul heatleyBio: Paul Heatley is the author of The Motel Whore & Other Stories, the Eye For An Eye series, Guns, Drugs, And Dogs, Fatboy, Christmas Stockings, and the forthcoming Guillotine and Bad Bastards, as well as over fifty short stories online and in print.

He lives in the north east of England.

Recommended Read:Christmas Stockings by Paul Heatley

Blue Collar Noir, Christmas, Crime Fiction, Noir, Non-fiction, Paul D. Brazill, Paul Heatley, Punk Noir Magazine, Recommended Reads

christmas stockingChris owns a dive bar and as such he is regularly drowning in the flotsam and jetsam of life. Even on Christmas Eve, when his customers include a drunken Santa Clause and Chris’ friend Randy – a perennial disaster waiting to happen.

Paul Heatley’s Christmas Stockings is a violent torch-song. Like a bittersweet blend of early Tom Waits and Jim Thompson, it’s a cracker!